Photos of Triassic aetosaur sculpture

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    A student compares a cast resin replica of an actual aetosaur skull with the work in progress. Photo by Travis Donovan

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    Appalachian’s aetosaur “Archie” took form from line art and a simple wire frame. Photo by Travis Donovan

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    Art students prepare the foam armature for the next step: application of the oil-based clay. Photo by Marie Freeman

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    Appalachian students, from left, Rebecca Bremer ’18, Hunter Hill ’15 and McKenzy Culbertson ’16 mix the oil-based clay used to cover the aetosaur’s armature. Photo by Marie Freeman

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    A rendering of a North Carolina landscape as imagined during the Triassic, in tropical Pangea. Internet photo

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    Appalachian professors Andy Heckert, foreground, and Travis Donovan compare an illustration to the Gorgetosuchus sculpture in progress. Photo by Marie Freeman

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    A screen shot of the digital 3-D model the students created from the illustrations of the aetosaur. Image provided by Travis Donovan

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    Using the 3-D digital model, the students rendered a pattern for the foam sections of the aetosaur’s armature. Photo by Travis Donovan

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    Appalachian students create a steel and foam armature based on a paleo-illustration of an aetosaur. The armature serves as a basic structure scaled to the general size of the imagined aetosaur. Photo Marie Freeman

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    Matt LeBlanc ’16 refines shaping on the aetosaur’s hind leg. Photo by Marie Freeman

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    Tiny etchings and intricate detail will enhance authenticity of the final casting. Photo by Travis Donovan

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    Close to completion, this clay, foam and wire-framed aetosaur is almost ready for bronze casting. Refining the armored plating on the back – the most distinguishing characteristics of this species of aetosaur – was critical in order to create as accurate a visual as possible for the interlocking plates and spikes. Photo by Travis Donovan

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    Members of a geology class study the specimens found in the Fred Webb Jr. Outdoor Geology Laboratory/Interactive Rock Garden.

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    An aerial view of the Fred Webb Jr. Outdoor Geology Laboratory/Interactive Rock Garden, which runs along Rankin Science South.

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