Teaching Excellence and Achievement program (TEA)

Appalachian hosts 21 international educators enhancing their teaching skills
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      Natalia Borta of Moldova leads an English class at Watauga High School, one of eight regional schools hosting TEA Fellows. Photo by Marie Freeman

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      TEA Fellow Natalia Borta of Moldova works closely with a student at Watauga High School. Mainov partnered with Watauga High School teacher Amanda Wallace during her fellowship. Photo by Marie Freeman

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      TEA Fellow Kamonrat Chimphali of Thailand works with biology students at Watauga High School, one of eight regional schools hosting TEA Fellows. Photo by Marie Freeman

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      Said Laaroua of Algeria talks with a student about a physics project at Watauga High School, one of eight regional schools hosting TEA Fellows. Photo by Marie Freeman

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      Said Laaroua of Algeria, second from right, discusses physics with students at Watauga High School, one of eight regional schools hosting TEA Fellows. Photo by Marie Freeman

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The Teaching Excellence and Achievement program (TEA), now in its seventh year, brings teachers from other countries to Appalachian State University to enhance their skills in teaching science and English as a foreign language.

From mid-September through Oct. 30, this year’s TEA Fellows are in the High Country learning about:

  • student-centered teaching approaches that are highly engaging
  • project-based teaching
  • instructional design and assessment
  • teacher-leadership throughout their careers

The TEA Fellows spend four weeks on Appalachian’s campus engaged in discipline-specific workshops. Then, they spend two weeks teaching in regional schools alongside a U.S. partner teacher.

Meet the 2017 TEA Fellows

The local community benefits from the program, too, as the visitors share their culture with local students and spend one weekend with host families.

“In coming to Appalachian and Boone, these master teachers greatly impact our campus and the local community. They contribute to global learning by meeting with hundreds of Appalachian students and local school children during their six weeks here,” said Dr. Maria Anastasiou, executive director of the Office of International Education and Development (OIED).

“More importantly, we hope the teachers will continue working with our students and faculty once they return home using the amazing technologies that they learn about during their time here.”

TEA is a program of the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and implemented by IREX. At Appalachian, it is cosponsored by OIED and the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures in the College of Arts and Sciences.

TEA leaders at Appalachian

TEA’s core team at Appalachian consists of Dr. Beverly Moser and Dr. Maria Anastasiou, project co-directors; John Spagnolo, technology coordinator; Dr. Linda McCalister, field experience coordinator; Dr. Rachel Potter and Dr. Leslie Bradbury, science teacher coordinators; and Mallory Sadler, social/cultural and logistics coordinator.

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